About us

Email: i n f o @ g u n m e m o r i a l . o r g
Phone: 7 7 3 - 4 5 3 - 5 5 5 6

Steve Tarzia, Publisher


Tamela Allison-Heim, Ashley Wu, Anne Li, Bryan Driscoll


Thousands of visitors just like you!

On an average day, 89 people are shot dead in the United States. This is a shocking statistic, but it is easy to forget that these are human beings, not just numbers. Steve started Gun Memorial in December of 2015 to humanize the problem by showing victims' faces and telling their stories. It is now a community effort with contributions from thousands of website visitors.

Mainstream media usually ignores the victims. We see news reports highlighting police work and the suspects. Audiences love a good detective story, but this type of reporting skews our public discourse on gun violence; it makes us more reactive than proactive.

We serve several audiences:

This is a non-profit project. We need donors and volunteers to continue this work. Please contact us if you can help.

Contact us

Email: i n f o @ g u n m e m o r i a l . o r g

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Frequently asked questions

How do you create your list of victims?

We get the names, dates, and locations of gun deaths every day from the Gun Violence Archive. Theirs is meant to be a complete list and their methodology is described here.

Why are your newest photos two weeks old?

By waiting ten to fourteen days, we improve our ability to gather photos by allowing time for obituaries to be published and for family members to get past the initial shock and start posting memorial photos of the deceased online. This is not meant to be a "breaking news" site.

Do you "pick and choose" who to show?

No. We try to find a photo for every single gun death reported on the Gun Violence Archive. There are about 89 people killed by guns in the U.S. each day. Most of these are suicides and information about these incidents is generally not available to us until the end of the year.

Where do you get your photos?

Most of our photos come from public places on the Internet. This includes obituaries, fundraising sites (such as Go Fund Me), news articles, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. We also allow family and friends to post photos.

Why do you call all these people "victims" when some of them are criminals?

We believe that every loss of life is a tragedy, especially for the families. Our goal is to simply show exactly who is killed by guns in the U.S. every day and let the public make their own judgements. We provide links to news articles that describe each incident.

Why do you group such different cases together on one page?

Certainly every case is different, but there is a common theme. The vast majority of these situations became deadly because a gun was available.

How do you verify that the photo is correct?

We check that the surname, location, date of death, and age match what is reported in the news and in Gun Violence Archive. We find that many victims use nicknames that do not match the official first name published in the news report. For verification purposes, we publish a link to the source of each image.

For example, Darius Jones' photo was not included in the news report or in his obituary. Finding a photo of him might seem difficult, since he has a common name. However, he lived in a small town of 2,320 residents where we can assume that he was the only 18-year old "Darius Jones." We searched through all the Jones on Facebook in Timmonsville, SC and found a profile for a young man calling himself Dinero "Money" Jones. This Facebook user looks to be Darius' age and he has not posted publicly since the date of the shooting, so it could be him. On the other hand, we don't see any public mourning comments from his Facebook friends, so we are not yet confident enough to use Dinero's photo. There are only a few other Jones on Facebook in his town, so we start checking those. We find Barbara Dukes-Jones and see that she recently changed her profile photo to a prom photo of the same young man. Her friends commented on the photo with words of condolence and mourning. That establishes the date of death, so we are confident that we have found Darius.

How do you choose a photo when several are available?

This involves some editorial judgement. This is a memorial site, so our goal is to choose a photo that might be chosen by family members for an obituary. We aim to show the victim's face clearly, and we prefer color photos. We will use a police booking photo (mugshot) only if no others are found.